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Posted on Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 6:42 a.m.

Why not extend Daylight Saving Time year-round?

By Letters to the Editor

We all know that our hours of daylight are determined by the physical laws of our universe. We know that Daylight Saving Time does not give us more hours of daylight; it simply lets us choose WHEN in our 24-hour period we call a "day" we get to enjoy the benefits of daylight.

I prefer my hours of daylight to extend further into the evening, rather than earlier in the morning. Therefore, I am delighted that we now have 8 months of Daylight Saving Time. Perhaps we could have even more? Possibly year-round? This happened in 1973-74, when the government decided that this would save on electricity.

It is not only farmers who benefit from Daylight Saving Time. Many of us enjoy extended daylight in the evenings for playing in and attending our outdoor band concerts, for longer bike rides, for longer hikes, for dining outside and picnicking, for golf, baseball, etc., and in the winter for more hours of cross-country skiing. We must not forget the many who work and commute and are happy to have at least some daylight for the evening commute and activities that follow.

Each day of Daylight Saving Time, I thank whoever thought of it. Cheers for Daylight Saving Time! Anne Carol Ormand Ann Arbor

Comments

Will

Mon, Nov 8, 2010 : 6:07 p.m.

Look: you can't golf early in the morning in November. Well you might be able to but it's usually uncomfortably cold and depending on where you live there might be dew on the ground. So what's the point of having daylight in the morning? There is none. Extend EST 24/7 and we could still be getting in 18 holes teeing off at noon. I don't see what the issue is.

ArgoC

Mon, Nov 8, 2010 : 7:37 a.m.

Some years ago DST did persist for a whole year, and I remember thinking in February, "this made the winter much better!" Yes, I had children at that time, but the bus thing didn't feel like a problem at all.

st.julian

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 5:06 p.m.

As I recall"all year" daylight saivngs time was enacted nationally for a shor period of time. It was withdrawn due to the issues regarding maong other things children walking or riding to school in the dark.

jcj

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 4:18 p.m.

I have an idea. Don't like what we have? All you in favor of no DST move to Alaska!

YpsiLivin

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 4:10 p.m.

Get rid of Daylight Savings Time altogether. If you want to enjoy more daylight, get up earlier in the summer, and if you're serious about having it year-round, move to Nova Scotia.

Steve Pepple

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 2:07 p.m.

Oops, let's give credit where credit is due. Make that TrekRider who pointed out the error.

jcj

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 2:03 p.m.

DonBee "The deer move around at dusk and dawn, having more cars on the road at those times will increase accidents, there are a dozen studies that show this is true." Before today it was light at approx 8am and dark at approx 7pm (DST) Today it was light at approx 7am and will be dark at approx 6pm (EST) Do do away with DST would not make much difference in car deer accidents! As there are probably more cars on the rd this week at 6pm with rush hour than last week at 7pm. I believe there are more car deer accident in the pm than the am.

ChrisW

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 1:57 p.m.

I like the idea of going on DST year round and it should be coupled with starting the school day later. Forcing kids (and parents!) to get up at 6am is just cruel and not conducive to a good educational experience.

SillyTree

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 1:55 p.m.

TrekRider gets the credit for pointing out the error.

SillyTree

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 1:53 p.m.

Actually, I didn't notice the error. Thanks for the credit anyway.

DonBee

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 1:37 p.m.

Some children walk to school. As the weather gets worse, it gets harder to see them walking. No matter what we do, there will be some period of time where children will be out in the dark either coming or going to school. The deer move around at dusk and dawn, having more cars on the road at those times will increase accidents, there are a dozen studies that show this is true. If you want more evening time, then find a job that starts earlier in the morning. There are plenty of places that start at 6 or 7 AM, which would let you out by 2 or 3 PM, plenty of time for daylight. Daylight savings time is not saving the amount of energy (the original goal) of energy that it was expected to. Maybe it is time to stop using Daylight Savings Time. Remember Michigan is all the way at the Western side of the time zone. If you want it to be an hour earlier all the time, move to the UP, the Western end is on Central Time.

Steve Pepple

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 1:09 p.m.

The headline and letter to the editor have been updated to correctly say Daylight Saving Time (instead of Savings). Thanks to reader SillyTree for pointing out the error.

SillyTree

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 12:53 p.m.

Yeah, that's why I quoted my source.

SillyTree

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 12:15 p.m.

Ed, Look at Greenland's time zones. Talk about politics affecting what time it is.

SillyTree

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 11:57 a.m.

Thanks jcj My "further research" was from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Time_Zone "When Daylight Saving Time was first introduced, the Lower Peninsula remained on DST after it formally ended, effectively re-aligning itself into the Eastern Time Zone. The Upper Peninsula continued to observe Central Time until 1972, when all but the four counties noted changed to Eastern Time." Quoted from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Time_Zone

SillyTree

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 11:49 a.m.

This was misworded: "Interestingly enough, the latest days do not occur on the same days as the earliest times. It would take too much space to explain that here. (Hint: The time it takes the sun to go from solar noon one day to solar noon the next day is not the same each day of the year.)" It should have read: "Interestingly enough, the latest sunrises do not occur on the same days as the earliest sunsets. It would take too much space to explain that here. (Hint: The time it takes the sun to go from solar noon one day to solar noon the next day is not the same each day of the year.)"

jcj

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 11:38 a.m.

The borders of its time zones ran through railroad stations, often in major cities. For example, the border between its Eastern and Central time zones ran through Detroit, Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Atlanta, and Charleston. It was inaugurated on Sunday, November 18, 1883, also called "The Day of Two Noons", when each railroad station clock was reset as standard-time noon was reached within each time zone. The zones were named Intercolonial, Eastern, Central, Mountain, and Pacific. Within one year, 85% of all cities with populations over 10,000, about 200 cities, were using standard time.[4] A notable exception was Detroit (which is about half-way between the meridians of eastern time and central time), which kept local time until 1900, then tried Central Standard Time, local mean time, and Eastern Standard Time before a May 1915 ordinance settled on EST and was ratified by popular vote in August 1916 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_zone An interesting article about how time was kept before railroads. http://www.mackinacislandnews.com/news/2005-05-20/Columnists/Railroads_Like_Michigan_Central_Helped_Create_Time.html

TrekRider

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 11:32 a.m.

Silly Tree, thanks for catching my error I should have said that the writers proposal would be the same as being in Atlantic Standard Time (think Nova Scotia or Peuto Rico) with no Daylight Saving Time (not Central is I indicated). However, I still would not want to be in the Central Time zone. If we had Eastern Standard Time in the summer, sunrise would be as early as 5:00 AM, sunset as late as 8:15, and noon falling after 12:30 (these approximate times are for Ann Arbor at the summer solstice). That sounds OK to me. If we had Central Standard Time, in the summer the sun would rise at 4:00 AM in Ann Arbor (without DST), and winter evenings would be dark an hour earlier than they are now. I could live without either of those scenarios, and I still think Eastern Standard Time with no DST would be preferable for Michigan. So while I would like to see us do away with Daylight Saving Time, I would NOT want to see Michigan on Atlantic Standard Time (year-round Eastern Daylight Time) as Ms. Ormand proposed OR Central Standard Time (even though that may be "geographically correct").

DagnyJ

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 11:25 a.m.

I like it as it is. I hate too much light too early, like sunrise at 5:30am in the summer and prefer more light into the evening. In the winter, I hate too little light in the AM, like sunrise at 8:30am. So, how about we keep it as is.

SillyTree

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 11:02 a.m.

Further research reveals that we actually were on Central Time before the advent of Daylight Savings Time.

SillyTree

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 10:29 a.m.

Ann Arbor is already in DST all year round to some degree. We should really be in the Central Time Zone, but we are not. When the time zones were set, Detroit wanted to be on the same time as New York so we wound up in the Eastern Time Zone. In the summer, we are actually on Super Duper DST. That is why we get daylight so late into the evening in the summer. We are an hour ahead of the time zone we should be in. It is also why we get later sunrises. It is true; the sun would not rise until 9:04 am if we were on DST all year. Of course, everybody has different and justifiable preferences. School children walking in the dark is a concern. This concern was not made up by a few posters that just want to disagree, but is actually an ongoing concern with the people that decide how we set our clocks. It may be an antiquated notion though as not too many walk anymore. Some more astronomy: The sun rises and sets at a more shallow angle with the horizon in the summer than it does in the winter. Twilight is extended in the summer months on both ends of the day. There is not as much twilight in the winter. Twilight begins as early as 5:23 am (EDT) in the summer and ends as late as 9:50 pm (EDT). In the winter it begins as late as 7:32 am (EST) and ends early as 5:34 pm (EST). Interestingly enough, the latest days do not occur on the same days as the earliest times. It would take too much space to explain that here. (Hint: The time it takes the sun to go from solar noon one day to solar noon the next day is not the same each day of the year.)

TrekRider

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 10:01 a.m.

It sounds like Ms. Ormand really wants us to move to Central Standard Time and eliminate Daylight Saving Time altogether (this would have the same effect as her proposal). Note: it is Daylight Saving Time (not Savings). At the summer solstice during DST, I find it odd to have sunrise at 6:00 AM, followed by "high noon" after 1:30 PM, and sunset at 9:15. In the winter, I prefer that children get on the school bus around first light, rather than in the pre-dawn pitch darkness. I also doubt that there are any real energy savings from DST. Your refrigerator, A/C, plasma TV, computers, hot water heater, etc. all use the same amount of energy with or without DST. With the expanding use of CFLs, any energy savings from lighting your home will diminish in the future. So while I would like to see us do away with Daylight Saving Time, I would NOT want to see Michigan on Central Standard Time (or year-round Eastern Daylight Time).

jcj

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 9:59 a.m.

snoopjane I think the point is if we did not stay on DST so late the kids would not have to be waiting in the dark in Oct. I believe making the change the middle of Oct would be a good compromise. I am sure most of the posters with the snide remarks about kids never had kids.

Huron74

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 9:14 a.m.

I agree. The politicians need to quit messin' with the clocks.

snoopjane

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 9:09 a.m.

If you notice the kids are already waiting for the bus in the dark and have been for about the last month. I agree, if you are worried about them, don't leave them out there by themselves!

dading dont delete me bro

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 8:59 a.m.

dst vs eastern standard time (est) when is it? as for the farmers, i've seen many combines in fields lately w/lights bright enough to signal in 747's flying over, so i doubt it matters much to them these days.

Peter

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 8:45 a.m.

"We all know that our hours of daylight are determined by the physical laws of our universe." Do you know this, really? I ask because if the issue is that you want it to stay lighter later during the winter, then why do you live here, in the northern part of the country, where we have fewer daylight hours than the vast majority of the country? Because of the curvature and angle of the earth, any location south of us gets more sunlight every single day during our winter. And this includes, what, 70-80% of the continental US? Getting that extra hour of sunlight in the evening may sound great, but it would mean that the sun wouldn't rise until 9:00 AM in December. Living in the north during the winter means snow. It means cold. It means short days. If you want to change this, it will be much easier to take the initiative and move south.

LAEL

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 8:44 a.m.

If we extended it all year around, then in Dec/Jan the sun wouldn't be rising until 9am. That's way too late.

Ignatz

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 8:40 a.m.

I just wish we'd quit moving back and forth. There's no real justification for it. As for which one, I'd prefer standard time. I don't need to read a book outside at 10 PM.

bugjuice

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 8:27 a.m.

Then ti wouldn't be DST. Changing it to all year around would just be moving the hands of the clock. Why not just change all the daylight hours to be in the night, then the nighttime hours to be all daylight?

jcj

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 8:21 a.m.

wcchamp4 "You people always have to look to the negative points of every article. " Your statement is not the most positive! @Anne Carol Ormand "It is not only farmers who benefit from Daylight Savings Time." Do you know many farmers? Do some research and you will find most farmers are against DST!

tdw

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 8:17 a.m.

Is there ANYTHING that people in Ann Arbor don't complain about?

Tarlach

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 7:42 a.m.

Completely agree. DST is silly.

wcchamp4

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 7:34 a.m.

"Who cares if elementary school children are waiting for their bus in pitch darkness?" Send them to the bus stop with a flashlight. Any other questions? if you are so worried about sending kids to the bus stop in darkness, then wait with them until the bus shows up or drive your kid to school instead. You people always have to look to the negative points of every article. As for me, I would love to have year-round daylight savings time!

Brad

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 7:24 a.m.

"Who cares if elementary school children are waiting for their bus in pitch darkness?" Send them to the bus stop with a flashlight. Any other questions?

Johnny

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 7:08 a.m.

I prefer permanent standard time. Reason- Too cold and dark in the mornings to work.

GettingBluer

Sun, Nov 7, 2010 : 7:06 a.m.

"I prefer my hours of daylight to extend further into the evening, rather than earlier in the morning." Who cares if elementary school children are waiting for their bus in pitch darkness?